FITness – lesson #3 Do you know you’re FATss……??

Please don’t take the title personally and grammar Nazi’s, just don’t !! Don’t even try for a second.

Today’s lesson is regarding what you should know about your body and about what you should eat. But the subject about what and how you should eat is SO BIG and so complex. I thought that knowing about about fats and body fats…will help you !

Let’s just explore the beautiful world of FAT’S !!!

5 LBS of fat vs 5 LBS of muscle

**Please note:  The information below was verified and analyzed before placed in this article. The information is not mine nor is it original by me.

So, many of you may know by now that there are 2 kinds of fats; THE BAD ONES  (saturated and trans) and the GOOD ONES  (monounsaturated fats, polyunsaturated fats and OMEGA 3)

Now something that you may know is that the food you eat is not responsible only for your body but also your mind, remember the saying “a healthy mind in a healthy body” ? well food affects your mood as well, and all these go and change your perception about yourself and along that about everybody else.

Saturated fats and trans fats are known as the “bad fats” because they increase your risk of disease and elevate cholesterol. It’s worth noting that not all “bad fats” are completely unhealthy; some, such as whole-fat dairy products which are a good source of calcium and protein, can have positive health benefits as well, when consumed in moderation.

Appearance-wise, saturated fats and trans fats tend to be solid at room temperature (think of butter or traditional stick margarine), while monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats tend to be liquid (think of olive or corn oil).

Monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats are known as the “good fats” because they are good for your heart, your cholesterol, and your overall health.

Therefor I present to you a table of contents :

GOOD FATS
Monounsaturated fat Polyunsaturated fat
  • Olive oil
  • Canola oil
  • Sunflower oil
  • Peanut oil
  • Sesame oil
  • Avocados
  • Olives
  • Nuts (almonds, peanuts, macadamia nuts, hazelnuts, pecans, cashews)
  • Peanut butter
  • Soybean oil
  • Corn oil
  • Safflower oil
  • Walnuts
  • Sunflower, sesame, and pumpkin seeds
    Flax seed
  • Fatty fish (salmon, tuna, mackerel, herring, trout, sardines)
  • Soy milk
  • Tofu

And the :

BAD FATS
Saturated fat Trans fat
  • High-fat cuts of meat (beef, lamb, pork)
  • Chicken with the skin
  • Whole-fat dairy products (milk and cream)
  • Butter
  • Cheese
  • Ice cream
  • Palm and coconut oil
  • Lard
  • Commercially-baked pastries, cookies, doughnuts, muffins, cakes, pizza dough
  • Packaged snack foods (crackers, microwave popcorn, chips)
  • Stick margarine
  • Vegetable shortening
  • Fried foods (French fries, fried chicken, chicken nuggets, breaded fish)
  • Candy bars

For most of you out there who cook (i sometimes do too), butter is one of the most delicious ingredient in most dishes, but if you can’t live without that, nobody says you can’t eat it, only don’t go overboard.  A light delicious snack can be good, but not an entire meal.

The USDA recommends that the average individual:

  • Keep total fat intake to 20-35% of calories (per day)
  • Limit saturated fats to less than 10% of your calories (200 calories for a 2000 calorie diet)
  • Limit trans fats to 1% of calories (2 grams per day for a 2000 calorie diet)

NOW who are they to tell you how to eat ???  Actually, nobody says you need to do this, but never complain if your overweight as to most people their weight problems are their choice, a small % of people suffer from different gland problems or other similar issues.

Here is a nice list which helps you figure out what to change and with what to change it :

Sources of Saturated Fats Healthier Options
Butter Olive oil
Cheese Low-fat or reduced-fat cheese
Red meat White meat chicken or turkey
Cream Low-fat milk or fat-free creamer
Eggs Egg whites, an egg substitute (e.g. Eggbeaters), or tofu
Ice cream Frozen yogurt or reduced fat ice cream
Whole milk Skim or 1% milk
Sour cream Plain, non-fat yogurt

Now how is this going to be relevant as I already made you all fat🙂 LOOK it’s in the title.

I’ve made a basic and nice presentation about bad fats and good fats you should eat. But what about the ones that are already in and on your body ?

Well, next I will present how fat’s reside in our bodies and what experts have to say about it.

Fat is known to have two main purposes, says Susan Fried, PhD, director of the Boston Obesity and Nutrition Research Center at Boston University and a long-time researcher in the field.

  • Fat stores excess calories in a safe way so you can mobilize the fat stores when you’re hungry.
  • Fat releases hormones that control metabolism.

But that’s the broad brushstroke picture. Read on for details about various types of fat — brown, white, subcutaneous and visceral fat.

Brown Fat

Brown fat has gotten a lot of buzz recently, with the discovery that it’s not the mostly worthless fat scientists had thought.

In recent studies, scientists have found that lean people tend to have more brown fat than overweight or obese people — and that when stimulated it can burn calories. Scientists are eyeing it as a potential obesity treatment if they can figure out a way to increase a person’s brown fat or stimulate existing brown fat.

It’s known that children have more brown fat than adults, and it’s what helps them keep warm. Brown fat stores decline in adults but still help with warmth. “We’ve shown brown fat is more active in people in Boston in colder months,” Cypess says, leading to the idea of sleeping in chillier rooms to burn a few more calories.

Brown fat is now thought to be more like muscle than like white fat. When activated, brown fat burns white fat.

Although leaner adults have more brown fat than heavier people, even their brown fat cells are greatly outnumbered by white fat cells. “A 150-pound person might have 20 or 30 pounds of fat“, Cypess says. “They are only going to have 2 or 3 ounces of brown fat.”

But that 2 ounces, he says, if maximally stimulated, could burn off 300 to 500 calories a day — enough to lose up to a pound in a week.

You might give people a drug that increases brown fat,” he says. “We’re working on one.”

But even if the drug to stimulate brown fat pans out, Cypess warns, it won’t be a cure-all for weight issues. It may, however, help a person achieve more weight loss combined with a sound diet and exercise regimen.

White Fat

White fat is much more plentiful than brown, experts agree. The job of white fat is to store energy and produce hormones that are then secreted into the bloodstream.

Small fat cells produce a “good guy” hormone called adiponectin, which makes the liver and muscles sensitive to the hormone insulin, in the process making us less susceptible to diabetes and heart disease.

When people become fat, the production of adiponectin slows down or shuts down, setting them up for disease, according to Fried and others.

Subcutaneous Fat

Subcutaneous fat is found directly under the skin. It’s the fat that’s measured using skin-fold calipers to estimate your total body fat.

In terms of overall health, subcutaneous fat in the thighs and buttocks, for instance, may not be as bad and may have some potential benefits, says Cypess. “It may not cause as many problems” as other types of fat, specifically the deeper, visceral fat, he says.

But subcutaneous fat cells on the belly may be another story, says Fried. There’s emerging evidence that the danger of big bellies lies not only in the deep visceral fat but also the subcutaneous fat.

Visceral Fat

Visceral or “deep” fat wraps around the inner organs and spells trouble for your health. How do you know if you have it? “If you have a large waist or belly, of course you have visceral fat,” Whitmer says. Visceral fat drives up your risk for diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and even dementia.

Visceral fat is thought to play a larger role in insulin resistance — which boosts risk of diabetes — than other fat, Whitmer tells WebMD. It’s not clear why, but it could explain or partially explain why visceral fat is a health risk.

Whitmer investigated the link between visceral fat and dementia. In a study, she evaluated the records of more than 6,500 members of Kaiser Permanente of Northern California, a large health maintenance organization, for an average of 36 years, from the time they were in their 40s until they were in their 70s.

The records included details on height, weight, and belly diameter — a reflection of the amount of visceral fat. Those with the biggest bellies had a higher risk of dementia than those with smaller bellies. The link was true even for people with excess belly fat but overall of normal weight.

She doesn’t know why belly fat and dementia are linked, but speculates that substances such as leptin, a hormone released by the belly fat, may have some adverse effect on the brain. Leptin plays a role in appetite regulation but also in learning and memory.

In the near future ill post more on how to loose Belly, Thigh and Buttocks Fat.

So stay tuned and stay fit !!

Posted on February 24, 2014, in FITness and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: